Scholarships

We have two scholarship funds named for individuals who exemplify our Foundation’s mission: Juanita Varela Childs and Gail Randolph. We fund scholarships for students who have faced adversity, are from very low-income families, and often have little or no financial help for college.


Juanita Varela Childs Scholarship

This scholarship is in memory of Juanita Varela Childs, a Spanish teacher at Carbon High School in Price, Utah who was committed to mentoring students. Carbon High serves a highly diverse population of rural students, many whose families immigrated to work in the coal mines that brought thousands to the area in the 1880’s. Juanita taught for 13 years at Carbon High and was known as the heartbeat of Carbon High. Born in Mexico, she moved to Los Angeles with her father and four younger brothers after her mother deserted them. Her father earned $600 a month working as a custodian at UCLA. It was there she met her adoptive mother, Marilyn Winkleby, an epidemiologist and UCLA public health professor, who established this scholarship. Juanita joined the Mormon Church as a young adult and upon completing high school graduated from BYU. During this time she completed her mission in Chicago, often giving away her belongings to those in need. She graduated from BYU in April 1992, with a major in Spanish Teaching and a minor in ESL. In 1993 Juanita married Kimball Childs from Castle Dale and their son Mason was born four years later. Tragically, Juanita died in a car accident with her husband and son on December 11, 2005. Since 2006, we have awarded 3-4 college scholarships a year in Juanita’s name to graduating seniors from Carbon High School.

Juanita Varela Childs

Juanita Varela Childs

How Students Remembered Juanita

“There was something about her that shown through. It was like a light that was deep inside her and burst through with every smile, laugh, and hug.”

“Señora Childs was one of the best anti-depressants in our school. Every time I walked into her class, I knew that she really cared about me individually. She was constantly striving and pushing me to improve. She didn’t just teach Spanish, she taught the essence of life!”

“She was like my mom (and everyone else’s) at school, only she spoke Spanish.”

“We were her life, her kids, her whole world.”

Statements from Juanita Scholarship Applications

“I moved to Price when I was 10 years old. Then I missed my 8th grade because I was in Primary Children’s Hospital with bone cancer. My father was laid off from the mines and gets odd jobs. My mother is ill but she makes and sells tamales. I plan on becoming a Spanish immersion teacher.”

(This young woman was a straight A student during her senior year and worked 15 hours a week. Both parents had less than a high school education. A note from her teacher stated that she was the hardest working student the teacher had in 39 years of teaching.)

“My passion has undoubtedly always been in graphic arts. I will be the first generation in my family to graduate from high school and then attend college. I want to increase my knowledge and set goals and have a career. I want to show my parents I can push myself to attend school until the finish line. A scholarship will help me do this!”

(This young man had strong grades, was a student body officer and editor of the yearbook, and worked 25 hours a week. He lived with his parents and five younger siblings; he cared for them and supervised their homework when his parents were gone frequently for several weeks at a time on long trucking jobs to Texas.)

“My father works at the steel plant and I work half time to help pay the gigantic hospital bill from my sister’s uninsured accident. Debate has changed my life and improved my confidence and work ethic. I won a trophy in the State competition. I love to learn and want to attend college and major in business.”

“I am going to attend college because I know that it will allow me to have many opportunities in the future instead of being miserable my whole life. I am going to Washing State University to study electrical engineering and minor in music so I can continue playing the trombone.”

(This young woman was a straight A student and lived with her mother who was disabled and her father who was unemployed.)

“My parents’ decisions have directly affected me. Their decision was to chose drugs and not education. Through I am at a disadvantage by overwhelming circumstances, those of us who choose to fight the cycle will make it through because we have the perseverance, that drive, that motivation to not let the entirety of our life be trapped. I know what college can do for me. My plan is to major in nursing. I have chosen our community college to start with because it is cheap but for me is still very expensive. I am applying for this scholarship hoping that you will see the potential in me so that I might pursue my goals in life.”

Appreciation from Scholarship Recipients

“I cannot express my gratitude enough to those responsible for my scholarship, as I wouldn’t be completing my degree currently, nor would I be continuing onto earn a Masters and eventually a PhD. I hope to continue in the legacy that Señora Childs left, to pursue my education whole heartedly and when able create a similar scholarship. As a student from rural Utah it is unbelievable to see how far I have been able to come with the initial help of this scholarship and the help of those more fortunate monetarily than I.”

 “The Juanita Scholarship has help me especially in my first year of college. I am the first member on my family to even attend and then graduate from high school. Going to college has shown my family that the hard work does pay off and is worth the time. As a student coming from a very low income family, I am continuing my education and pursuing my education to become a teacher.”

“I am currently a Junior at Utah State University, planning on graduating next spring with a degree in Sociology with a minor in Criminology. The scholarship helped me by paying for all of my textbooks the first year. If it wasn’t for that scholarship, I would have had no other way to begin college.”


Gail Randolph Scholarship

Gail Randolph

Gail

Gail Randolph is a retired teacher who taught second through eighth grades for nearly forty years. She graduated from San Jose State University in 1962 with a degree in Elementary Education, an Elementary Science minor, and a Lifetime Elementary Teaching Credential.  In 1993 she earned a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology. She is known for her passion for working with people facing difficulties and inspiring them towards finding their own strength and gifts for the world. For this scholarship we have partnered with Alta Vista High School in Mountain View that has been designated a Model Continuation High School by the California State Department of Education. It offers an individualized learning approach and successful viable alternative for students whose needs have not been met in the traditional high school setting. We awarded the first Gail Randolph scholarship in 2015 to Zochil, a graduating senior who plans to study science and enter medical school.

Click here to read Gail’s story.

Zochil

Zochil, first recipient of the Gail Randolph Scholarship

From Scholarship Recipient

“Coming to Alta Vista was rehabilitative for me; it was a fresh start. Ever since elementary school I have wanted to become a doctor, and this goal has been reinforced each passing year. I always looked forward to science classes such as chemistry, biology, and physics because while everything else in my life was chaotic, the sciences were always stable and consistent. My interest is science helped me get through some of the toughest times in my life. It is for this reason that I want a career in the sciences; I want to become a pediatrician, which will allow me to combine my love of kids and my passion for science. Thank you for helping me.”